what is a compound sentence

what is a compound sentence

A chemical sentence has two separate clauses which have related thoughts.

In any scenario, each half of this sentence needs to have the ability to stand as a sentence on its own. That means every half wants a verb and a subject. As an instance:

  • That I need the sporty red car, however, that I will rent the blue one.

The next half which comes after the comma and coordinating conjunction is also an entire sentence, together with the topic”I” and the verb”will rent.”

Many chemical sentences are created with coordinating conjunctions, as you have seen previously. In cases like this, the sentence should have a comma prior to the mix for proper punctuation. As an instance:

  • Because it had been the thing she didn’t cheat on the test.
  • I am too ill to drive, although I must go to work.
  • I’m restricting my calories, however I truly want dessert.
  • He ran out of cash, so he needed to quit playing poker.
  • They’d no ice cream nor did they have the cash to visit the shop.
  • Everybody was busy, so I went into the film.
  • I thought the promotion was mine but my presence was not great.
  • If we begin the course now or wait to get here?
  • It was getting dark, and we weren’t close to the cottage.
  • Cats are pets that are great, for they aren’t noisy and are sterile.
  • He did not wish to visit the dentist, however, he went.

Additionally, it is possible by mixing two sentences to combine sentences. In cases like this, you should utilize a semicolon to combine both separate clauses. As an instance:

  • The sugar biscuits were created by joe; they were decorated by Susan.

Even though this is grammatically correct, it’s also feasible to smooth the transition from 1 clause to another with conjunctive adverbs for example, however, moreover, meanwhile and therefore. To utilize these properly, set them, and insert a comma. As an instance:

  • It was a challenging mission.

Observe chemical sentence illustrations linked with semicolons under:

  • The sky is clear.
  • The waves crashed to the coast; it was a sight.
  • There were white-out states from town the streets were impassable.
  • Check back whether the publication has arrived, I shall see.
  • He explained he wasn’t there yesterday; he was seen by lots of people.
  • I’m pleased to take your contribution.
  • She paints with colors that are bold she doesn’t like pastels.
  • She works two jobs to make ends meet; for not having the time to connect us, at least, that was her motive.
  • Malls are places I could find.
  • Italy is my country; next year I intend to spend there.
  • He turned on Friday at the study paper; he and the course would haven’t passed.
  • You have to package the appropriate items for camping.
  • I’ve paid my dues; as a consequence, I hope to get the statements.

Sentences are frequent in writing and speech. Listed below are examples of sentences employed by statistics that are famous:

  • “Government doesn’t solve problems; it subsidizes them” – Ronald Reagan
  • – Mae West
  • – Jimmy Carter
  • “I have opinions of my own strong remarks, but I do not always agree with them”
  • – Bill Clinton

Do Not overlook the Punctuation

Now you’ve seen instances of sentences that are compound, you can add them. 1 benefit of sentences is that more detail can be built by you. Just take care to stick to the punctuation rules explained above and avoid run-on sentences.

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